Job Security

 

Introduction

Structural changes in the labor market that have occurred over the last few decades have loosened ties between workers and firms. As a result, finding stable employment has become difficult for many individuals. Workers who lose their jobs often lack the skills to secure other employment. Other workers are underemployed, unable to find work that requires their level of education and skills. Still others piece together a livelihood by holding multiple jobs.


Issues

  • What are the trends in worker tenure? Do these trends vary by the characteristics of the workers?
  • How effective are the public job training programs intended to assist dislocated workers?
  • What are the trends in underemployment? Do these trends differ by worker characteristics?
  • What are the implications for families and workers of multiple job holding?

Selected Institute Research

Employment and Training Policy in the United States during the Economic Crisis
Christopher O’Leary, Upjohn Institute
Randall Eberts, Upjohn Institute
Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 10-161, November 2009

“Do Temporary-Help Jobs Improve Labor Market Outcomes for Low-Skilled Workers? Evidence from ‘Work First’”
David Autor, MIT
Susan Houseman, Upjohn Institute
American Economic Journal: Applied Economics 2(3): 96-128, 2010

Displacement, Asymmetric Information, and Heterogeneous Human Capital
Luojia Hu, Department of Economics and Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University
Christopher Taber, Department of Economics and Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University
Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 07-136, June 2007

Losing Work, Moving On:International Perspectives on Worker Displacement
Peter J. Kuhn, University of California, Santa Barbara, editor
Upjohn Institute Press, 2003
More Institute Research on Job Security